Entertainment / Local

Amakhosi play sparks storm

by Arts reporter
30 Jan 2013 at 05:29hrs | 3636 Views
THE Amakhosi Plays on Sunday seems to be paying dividends as last week's play I want to Fly by Bulawayo playwright Thembelihle Moyo, is promising to be a thriller on the local scene.

The theatre schedule which began in November last year has given budding writers and directors a platform to showcase their works.

The play, I want to fly written and directed by Moyo depicts the life of women who are often subject of abuse from their male counterparts and some cultural practices.

Moyo's play provoked a storm of protest over issues of forced marriage and ill-treatment due to barreness.

In the play, Yinka is a young and aspiring pilot who hails from a strong rural background where women are oppressed and the only achievement they have in life is marriage.

Her father out of greediness forcibly marries Yinka to her uncle, as her aunt, Sarah is barren.

Yinka, played by Qeqeshiwe Mthambo depicts the life of a disadvantaged young girl who fights for her rights.

Although, the play could improve on presentation and stage work it is a promising play that arouses issues which are often swept under the carpet under the guise of culture.

The audience was kept in stitches by the hilarious Shumba who at one time attempted to rape his niece Yinka.

The play also tackles issues of traditional herbs which are often used by women to improve their sexual and marriage life.

However, the audience was left in suspense at the end of the play as Yinka used it as a tool of freedom as she left her husband-cum-uncle moaning and groaning as she fled from the jaws of a forced marriage.

The Amakhosi Plays on Sunday has seen over 10 plays premiering at the cultural centre and the theatre audiences are getting better by the day.

In an interview after the show, Moyo said she was happy with the response from fans and was hoping the play would go places.

"I would like to thank all those who came to watch my play and we will work on various stages were we are lacking," said Moyo.

She said that the play was not against men, but about changing the values of society.

Source - Amakhosi
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